A Step by Step guide on How to care for your Barbour Wax Jacket

When to Wax your Jacket

Have you checked out the condition of your Barbour Wax jacket lately? With Spring and Summer just around the corner and wax jackets being the top coat choice for walking this season there has never been a better time to give your wax jacket a bit of a spruce up! If it has been a while since you last treated your jacket to a bit of TLC now may be the time for the annual re-waxing session. If for Christmas or early birthday present you were gifted a silky smooth wax jacket then this post isn’t for you just yet…but don’t leave as it will be something to keep in the back of your mind for next spring. If like me you have had your jacket for well over a year and spent a fair amount of time in it, before stuffing it into the back of the closet for the winter months, and have just got it out and given it a good dusting – it may be time to follow some simple steps to revive your once loved, everyday wax jacket.

All Barbour Waxed Jackets need some level of upkeep to ensure the wax keeps the jacket waterproof and Barbour recommend that you reproof your jacket every year. If the jacket does not become your main jacket that you wear every day you should get away with skipping a year and re-waxing every other. Rather than sending your jacket away to be re-proofed and if you want to save some pennies you can buy Barbour Wax Thornproof dressing and do it at home yourself. Once you’ve done that you probably want to think about a cracking pair of Wellington boots – but Walking In Wellies. Is that even a thing? Check out our Barbour Bede Wellington Review to give you some more inspiration.

Get the Gear

Make sure you get all of the things you will need to re-wax your Barbour Jacket together before you start the process. There is nothing worse than being half way through a job and realising you don’t have something and then get stuck trying to use alternatives essentially doing half the job you set out to do – we’ve all been there.

  1. Barbour Wax Thornproof Dressing
  2. Two sponges or Cloths
  3. Hot Water
  4. Jug/Container (Large enough for Hot Water to surround the Wax tin)
  5. Clean Surface
  6. Coat Hanger

Step By Step Guide

  1. Clean your Jacket: Using cold or tepid water gently rub the outside of your jacket with a wet sponge or cloth to remove any surface dirt. Be careful not to use hot water as this will melt the wax and soak into the cotton of the jacket. Do not use soap, stain remover or detergents and never put the jacket in the washing machine as this will strip the jacket of it’s wax coating and you may not be able to get it back to that perfect factory finish resulting in a ruined coat and one unhappy half wax jacket owner!
  2. Melt the Wax: Soften the wax by removing the lid and sitting the tin in a container of hot water for 10-15 minutes. You should see the wax change from a solid cream wax into a transparent liquid consistency. In this softened state it will be easier to work with and the cotton jacket will absorb the wax more consistently all over. Once it has reached this stage it is ready to use. If the wax starts setting just replace the water surrounding the tin with hot water again.
  3. Wax your Jacket: With a dry sponge or cloth take some of the wax and apply it evenly across the whole of the outer of the wax jacket paying particular attention to creases and seams. (places that can often be forgotten are under pocket flaps, on fold back cuffs and around the adjustable side tabs). Work the wax into the jacket by using small circular motions and try to apply it evenly to avoid large wax build up. Places that seem to be drier may need a little more wax to get them to the same level as other areas of your jacket. Take extra care around collars, inner fabric and linings – if you get wax here you’re going to know about it and potentially damage the fabric. If you do get any excess wax spots just wipe it off with a clean sponge and ensure that the area is worked to give an even and consistent covering. Once you have covered your jacket go over it with a dry/clean cloth to take off any excess unnecessary wax that may have accumulated as you have waxed other parts of your jacket.
  4. Dry your Jacket: If you like the “wet” waxed jacket look then leave your newly waxed jacket in a warm room to dry out but make sure you check on it regularly to make sure it is not drying and cracking. If this happens you may need to gently heat the wax using a hair-dryer and re-work the wax with a sponge. If you like the “factory finish” look you can achioeve this by getting out your hair-dryer and dry your jacket, evenly spreading the wax, moving the heat evenly over the surface to help it dry properly but be careful not to get the hot hair-dryer too close to the jacket as this will melt the wax and potentially damage your jacket.
  5. Give it Time: Once you have completed the above steps don’t just think you can wear-and-go. With all things a little bit of time will ensure that your jacket is fully dry and ready for it’s first revitalised trip out. When you are happy with the finish hang the jacket up (without it being all creased) and leave it overnight to make sure that it has completely dried. Make sure this is away from other clothes and materials as there can be excess wax that could rub off onto these other items – which would be rather annoying if you don’t catch it and end up with a wax patch on your favourite shirt or on the arm of the sofa (I can tell you now that the other half will not be very amused!)

If you need some visual guidance check out my step by step guide video titled “How to simply rewax your Barbour Jacket” on youtube. If you are committed to caring for your Barbour Wax Jacket it will be comitted to caring for you.

 

Summary
Review Date
Reviewed Item
Barbour Wax Thornproof Dressing
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Marketing & Social Media Manager

I love the outdoors and I love good food. So guess what I do for a job? Yep, Marketing & Social Media for e-OUTDOOR and Director of House of Goodness Ltd.